• Images
  • Topics
  • Boards
https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/https://www.rawpixel.com/image/3259358Solar panels at Sauerbier Ranches LLC, where producer Dan Doornbos (vest) and son-in-law ranch operator Ryan Ellis, were…Save

Solar panels at Sauerbier Ranches LLC, where producer Dan Doornbos (vest) and son-in-law ranch operator Ryan Ellis, were able to implement brush management practices and install a solar-powered (photovoltaic) electric well pump and distribution system with the help of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) John Wagoner (cowboy hat), at Sweetwater Basin, in southwest Montana, on August 27, 2019.

Brush management practice has opened the rangeland for cattle to better graze and improve the land. On other parts of the ranches, well pumps draw water from the aquifer below a creek. The pump pushes water through pipelines, up to rangelands more than two miles away to draw cattle to a variety of grazing areas. This improves the water quality by drawing the cattle from the nearby flowing creek; provides more water from a more stable underground water resource; allows the land to rest from the presence of the cattle; allows the manure to return to the soil so that the plants can better grow back, and provides drinking water for the cattle in remote rangelands.

 

 

Brush Management is the management or removal of woody (non-herbaceous or succulent) plants including those that are invasive and noxious. This creates the desired plant community consistent with the ecological site or a desired state within the site description; restores or release desired vegetative cover to protect soils, control erosion, reduce sediment, improve water quality, or enhance hydrology.• Maintain, modify, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat; improves forage accessibility, quality, and quantity for livestock and wildlife; Manages fuel loads to achieve desired conditions; controls pervasive plant species to a desired level of treatment that will ultimately contribute to creation or maintenance of an ecological site description “steady-state” addressing the need for forage, wildlife habitat, and/or water quality.

 

 

Pumping Plant is a facility that delivers water at a designed pressure and flow rate. Includes the required pump(s), associated power unit(s), plumbing, appurtenances, and may include on-site fuel or energy source(s), and protective structures.

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

 

 

For more information, please see:

 

Brush Management - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1254946.pdf

 

Water Well - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs143_026211.pdf

 

Pumping Plant Pumping Plan - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1046901.pdf

 

NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

 

Brush Management is the management or removal of woody (non-herbaceous or succulent) plants including those that are invasive and noxious. This creates the desired plant community consistent with the ecological site or a desired state within the site description; restores or release desired vegetative cover to protect soils, control erosion, reduce sediment, improve water quality, or enhance hydrology.• Maintain, modify, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat; improves forage accessibility, quality, and quantity for livestock and wildlife; Manages fuel loads to achieve desired conditions; controls pervasive plant species to a desired level of treatment that will ultimately contribute to creation or maintenance of an ecological site description “steady-state” addressing the need for forage, wildlife habitat, and/or water quality.

 

Pumping Plant is a facility that delivers water at a designed pressure and flow rate. Includes the required pump(s), associated power unit(s), plumbing, appurtenances, and may include on-site fuel or energy source(s), and protective structures.

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

 

 

For more information, please see:

 

Brush Management - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1254946.pdf

 

Water Well - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs143_026211.pdf

 

Pumping Plant Pumping Plan - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1046901.pdf

 

NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

 

Brush Management is the management or removal of woody (non-herbaceous or succulent) plants including those that are invasive and noxious. This creates the desired plant community consistent with the ecological site or a desired state within the site description; restores or release desired vegetative cover to protect soils, control erosion, reduce sediment, improve water quality, or enhance hydrology.• Maintain, modify, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat; improves forage accessibility, quality, and quantity for livestock and wildlife; Manages fuel loads to achieve desired conditions; controls pervasive plant species to a desired level of treatment that will ultimately contribute to creation or maintenance of an ecological site description “steady state” addressing the need for forage, wildlife habitat, and/or water quality.

 

 

Pumping Plant is a facility that delivers water at a designed pressure and flow rate. Includes the required pump(s), associated power unit(s), plumbing, appurtenances, and may include on-site fuel or energy source(s), and protective structures.

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

 

 

For more information, please see:

 

Brush Management - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1254946.pdf

 

Water Well - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs143_026211.pdf

 

Pumping Plant Pumping Plan - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1046901.pdf

 

NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

 

Brush Management is the management or removal of woody (non-herbaceous or succulent) plants including those that are invasive and noxious. This creates the desired plant community consistent with the ecological site or a desired state within the site description; restores or release desired vegetative cover to protect soils, control erosion, reduce sediment, improve water quality, or enhance hydrology.• Maintain, modify, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat; improves forage accessibility, quality, and quantity for livestock and wildlife; Manages fuel loads to achieve desired conditions; controls pervasive plant species to a desired level of treatment that will ultimately contribute to creation or maintenance of an ecological site description “steady state” addressing the need for forage, wildlife habitat, and/or water quality.

 

 

Pumping Plant is a facility that delivers water at a designed pressure and flow rate. Includes the required pump(s), associated power unit(s), plumbing, appurtenances, and may include on-site fuel or energy source(s), and protective structures.

 

USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

 

 

For more information, please see:

 

Brush Management - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1254946.pdf

 

Water Well - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs143_026211.pdf

 

Pumping Plant Pumping Plan - nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb1046901.pdf

 

NRCS - nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/site/national/home/

 

Farm Production and Conservation - usda.gov/our-agency/about-usda/mission-areas

 

USDA - USDA.gov

 

. Original public domain image from Flickr

More

View License

Say thanks by supporting these good causes

Solar panels at Sauerbier Ranches LLC, where producer Dan Doornbos (vest) and son-in-law ranch operator Ryan Ellis, were able to implement brush management practices and install a solar-powered (photovoltaic) electric well pump and distribution system with the help of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources and Conservation Service (NRCS) John Wagoner (cowboy hat), at Sweetwater Basin, in southwest Montana, on August 27, 2019.

More